PowerWriting: Stage 5

Welcome to Power Writing Stage 5.  So far you’ve learned about basic paragraph structure. You know a PowerGraph helps maintain the structure and focus you have on a selected topic. It can be any of the following structures:

1,2,2begins with a P1 – or a Power 1. P1 is the first sentence in a PowerGraph that serves as a the topic sentence.

Let’s Review PowerWriting So Far

The P1 include the topic, the focus, and the word “two”. You also learned that P2’s – or Power 2’s are subcategories or examples that support your Power 1. Using the word “two” in the Power 1 let’s your reader know you are promising them two Power 2 in support of the topic sentence.

You also included a Power 3 following each Power 2. Power 3’s, when structured correctly, are what allow you to maintain focus and clarity in a PowerGraph. The Power 3’s provide elaboration to the Power 2 that comes before it… AND… it also connects backs making specific reference to the focus presented in the Power 1.

Practicing PowerWriting Makes Progress

Make sure you’ve taken time to practice generating no less than five 1,2,3,2,3 PowerFrames and their companion PowerGraphs. This practice will help you develop a reflexive thinking process to include the required elements that make PowerWriting different from other writing methods you may have experienced in the past.


Now Let’s Move on to PowerWriting Stage 5

In Stage 5 you are using a new PowerFrame structure. You’re also removing the word “two” from the first sentence. This is because it is no longer relevant to the new PowerFrame structure.

Look at your new  PowerFrame for Stage 5

P1 : ____________________________

         P2: ____________________________

                P3: ______________________________

          P2: ____________________________

                 P3: ______________________________

          P2: ____________________________

                    P3: ______________________________

 

How many sentences will be this PowerGraph?  Knowing that each Power is a sentence of it’s own, it should be revealed to you that a 1,2,3,2,3,2,3 will result in a seven sentence PowerGraph.

Here is an example of a Stage 5 PowerFrame and the PowerGraph generated from the given PowerFrame.


PowerFrame Stage 5

P1 : _____ sports  + I enjoy watching _____

         P2: ____soccer ______

                P3: ____dad and I  on saturdays___

          P2: _____baseball ____

                 P3: _____my friends in Joliet________

          P2: ______volleyball ___

                    P3: ______Pep Club for school team________

PowerGraph Stage 5

There are a few sports I enjoy watching. The first one is soccer, the sport of endurance. Dad and I have bonded for years because we attend soccer games together every Saturday. Another sport that I find entertaining to watch is baseball. My friends and I take a bus to Joliet to watch Slammers for every home game. The last sport I watch with great excitement is volleyball. I am in the Pep Club, and there is always a large group watching from the stands to cheer our school team on to victory.

 

Stage 5 Color Coding

             There are a few sports I enjoy watching. The first one is soccer, the sport of endurance. Dad and I have bonded for years because we attend soccer games together every Saturday. Another sport that I find entertaining to watch is baseball. My friends and I take a bus to Joliet to watch Slammers for every home game. The last sport I watch with great excitement is volleyball. I am in the Pep Club, and there is always a large group watching from the stands to cheer our school team on to victory.


What’s Different Between Stage 4 and Stage 5?

  • There are 3 Power 2
  • “two” is replaced by “a few”
  • seven sentences long

What Are the Transitions Used in Power 2’s?

  • “The first one…”
  • “Another…”
  • “The last…”

These transitions are more appropriate to present three examples supporting the Power 1. In the PowerFrame you have established the need for 3 supporting statements because there are three Power 2 in the PowerFrame.

It’s time for you to practice on your own. Go back to the very simple PowerFrame you generated in Stage 2. Use these to guide your thoughts. Expand those PowerFrames to Stage 5 PowerFrames.

You can also generate 100% new PowerFrame topics. Either way is fine. But, you must practice in order to deepen your understanding of this new structure.


Another Example of PowerWriting Stage 5

Stage 5 PowerFrame:

P1:  books + keeps readers’ attention

          p2:   House of the Scorpion

                    P3: complex plot

          P2:   Son of the Mob

                    P3: Humor with challenges

          P2:   Define Normal

                    P3: people aren’t always as they seems

Stage 5 PowerGraph

                   There are few books that have to ability to keep readers’ attention. The first book able to get the attention of a young reader is House of the Scorpion. This book has a gripping plot with many twists and turns causing the main character to face challenges that seem impossible to to overcome.  The second book guaranteed to keep readers’ attention is Son of the Mob. It’s easy to stay focused on this story because the author uses humor to reveal conflicts between the main character and his dad who’s a criminal. The last, and most enticing book on my list of captivating reads is Define Normal. In this book, there are two main characters who seem very different from one another, but they come to discover they are more alike than they imagined regardless of the false images they portray to the world!

This example above isn’t perfect. There are many details that could be revised in order to meet the criteria of an effective PowerGraph. However, I want you to see what is possible with progress. This 1,2,3,2,3,2,3 is far more advanced than the 1,2,2 structure revealed in previous stages of PowerWriting.


Your Turn

Start practicing! Build your collection of PowerFrames and PowerGraphs in your collection of writing. Change the structure to exercise the ability to write differently while staying focused. If you want some guidance, download the worksheets below that provide a variety of structure.

Suggestions for Independent PowerWriting

  1. Make a list of topics of activities, hobbies, areas of interest, experiences, passions, frustrations, etc. this list will serve as a possible topics for future independent writing sessions you create for yourself.  Having a list of ideas within reach will help you stay in the groove of writing and avoid writer’s block in the future.
  2. Recycle other PowerFrames you’ve created. If you generated a 1,2,2 that is very simplicity. Try to create a 1,2,3,2,3 from that same PowerFrame. You can even try to generate a 1,2,3,2,3,2,3 from that very same 1,2,2.
  3. Write a PowerGraph a day… or more. Carve out a little time to exercise your writing muscle and sticking to the structure provided in each stage you chose to practice.
  4. Keep track or your Progress. Put a date on everything you write. Save all your work in a file. Looking back on your progress and development helps you stay  motivated and dedicating to your self-improvement.

 

 

Move on to PowerWriting Stage 6